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20131202
20131210
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
had been partly -- part of a civil rights movement and fought against jim crow, which is our apartheid in america. we appreciated someone who was rising above the situation in south africa so the world could know. for many years their struggle was going on and nobody was listening. >> absolutely. you wrote in your piece on nelson mandela to the very end, he was frail and somewhat forgiveful and remained the father of the nation for south africans and in several trips he made to the hospital over the past two years, he was in his own way preparing his family biological and extended, for his final return home. he was 95. we know this life is not permanent in this form here. when you -- the news broke, despite his age and despite knowing his health situation, no one wanted to let him go for what he represented, even though that continues as he's passed away. >> i think so many people wish it could continue even more intensely. but i've got rn e-mails from friends in south africa who were doctor and people who like you said watched his progression and they say even though -- they've been w
, the '60s is a movement, the years of civil rights movement, the '80s, south africa, anti-apartheid activism, i think there was both but it was so riveting and real. even back to sharkville and the killing of 69 people, the kids in '76 in soweto. high school and elementary school children who are gunned down. it's tallas power of the images. you talked about nelson mandela. we did not see him for decades because they forbid his pic churs or voice from being heard. now we have the pictures from south africa. when you have children being gunned down, that is very hard to talk about. >> when we come back, what happened when ted cruz try day friday -- tried to remember nelson mandela this week. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our com
by hard it's been because stuff that's worth it is always hard. the civil rights movement was hard. get women the right to vote, that was hard. making sure that workers have the right to organize, that was hard. you know, it's never been easy for us to change how we do business in this country. this has been the case for social security, for medicare, for all of the great social progress that we've made in this country. >> krystal, it sounds like he's trying to get them to remember the reason they got involved in his presidential campaign. >> yeah, i think so. and i think it's important that we keep the perspective on why it's taken so long to reform our health insurance. it is because it's hard and there are parts that are disruptive and it makes people uncomfortable but ultimately we have put our faith and trust in this law and in this president and i think we're going to be better off for it. >> zeke emanuel and krystal ball, thank you. >>> coming up, a last word exclusive, those three high school athletes who were arrested in rochester, new york, this week while they were waiting fo
a message to state legislatures. >> i think it's a big help. the civil rights act didn't end racism. i don't think this is going to end homophobia or transphobia. >> reporter: zachary kiesch, news 4. >>> right now at 6:00, d.c. mayor vincent gray talks up his administration after announcing he will seek re-election but gets testy with reporters who challenge him on skal dal allegations. >> i'm done. i'm done, okay, i'm done. >>> plus, a d.c. cop facing charges of child pornography for pictures he took on the job. why there could be more victims. >>> president obama taking on critics of the affordable care act. >> the bottom line is, this law is working and will work into the future. >>> good evening, everybody. i'm jim handly in for jim vance. >> i'm doreen gentzler. we begin with the fast moving race for d.c. mayor a day after vincent gray filed for re-election. reporters peppered him with questions about a federal probe of his 2010 campaign for mayor. tom sherwood reports all gray wanted to talk about was what's ahead. tom? >> the mayor is proud of the city's economic development, but he
in the southerners that fled after the passage of the civil rights act and precipitated the migration of the center of gravity in the republican party to the south. and you see this, you know, not just in the evolution of the elected officials in the party but also in polling of the attitudes of republicans, you know, republican voters. it's not an accident that the republican party said rosa parks has ended racism. because in polls you constantly see the majorities of republican voters and conservative voters believe that the real discrimination in this country is against white people and that kind of all structural racism had been eradicated. this wasn't a slip of the tongue as much as it was the accidentally revealing a basic tenant of conservative thought. >> i politely disagree with michelle. i don't know what poll that is. i would love to get the site of the polls that are saying that a vast majority of republicans view that there's reverse discrimination. and there's more white persons being discriminated against in this country and that's the real racism. certainly that was not the party th
that are starting to say, you know what, we're going to have to treat this almost like the civil rights movement. we're going to have to break this down into pieces and just keep moving the ball forward, but we cannot keep the status quo that we have right now. that doesn't work for anybody. >> the political equation is so interesting, i think, in this case because as you pointed out, margie, when you look at the polls and the demographics of the voting public, it just makes sense. now we're seeing chris christie, who of course is being named as a possible nominee in 2016, being accused of flip-flopping on in-state tuition for young, undocumented immigrants because his critics say he wants to run for president. he says he continues to support the idea, although he won't sign the specific bill that was passed by his state legislature. here's what he said yesterday about that flip-flopping charge. >> i am for tuition equality. as i said that night at the latino leadership, i am for tuition quality. i am not for adding tuition aid grants or adding undocumented out of state students to have rights that
they were supposed to do. and still, yet, they get arrested. >> under federal civil right laws there have been cases in the second circuit that have gone a lot further. if i was a law enforcer, i would think about dismissing charges. >> today, the monroe county district attorney said in a statement after reviewing the facts associated with these arrests, i have decided to dismiss the charges in the interest of justice. joining me now is james peterson, associate professor of english at lehigh university. also an msnbc contributor. this looked like the outcome that had to happen, after our program last night, the mayor of rochester came out against this. i was deliberately on this show last night doing everything i could, including booking dan french, to push this prosecutor back and to push the police back on this arrest. >> that's right, and listen, kudos to you, your show, and your producers for making this national news. we have to give credit where it's due. really important here, lawrence. i'm teaching a class right now in black prison narrative. i'm studying michelle alexander and t
a pivotal moment in civil rights history that happened on this day 60 years ago. the landmark brown versus the board of education decision of 1954 declared that separate public schools for black and white students were unconstitutional. an important part of that decision was the one that applied to washington, d.c. and six decades ago today two lawyers argued the washington, d.c. portion of the case. their argument, school segregation was a violation of liberty. the decision would have a direct impact on the first high school in the country, dunbar high school in washington, d.c. opened in 1870 and despite being segregated, it developed ground breaker after ground breaker. including george hayes. one of the lawyers who argued the case. and charles hamilton houston, the lawyer known as the man who killed jim crow. this year a great book chronicles the school in "first class: the legacy of dunbar, america's first black public high school." joining me now is the author allison stewart. allison, thanks for being here. >> i am thrilled to be here. >> let's start 60 years ago today. they argued
. is he forced to make this apology by the north koreans? >>> plus, cnn on the front lines right now in syria's civil war. our own cnn crew gets rare access to one of the most brutal conflicts on the planet right now. there are seniors who have left hundreds of dollars of savings on the table by not choosing the right medicare d plan. no one could have left this much money here. whoo-hoo-hoo! yet many seniors who compare medicare d plans realize they can save hundreds of dollars. cvs/pharmacy wants to help you save on medicare expenses. talk to your cvs pharmacist, call, or go to cvs.com/compare to get your free, personalized plan comparison today. call, go online, or visit your local store today. millions have raised their hand for the proven relief of the purple pill. and that relief could be in your hand. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn symptoms from acid reflux disease. find out how you can save at purplepill.com. there is risk of bone fracture and low magnesium levels. side effects may include headache, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. if you have persistent diarrhea, cont
to describe what's going on. because that's part of the problem. so i don't see it as a civil war. i see it as -- i see it as what happens when a party is out of power, and there isn't one unifying voice. if i ask you guys right now, you are knitting over there, who is the leader of the republican party today? [inaudible] >> he's my friend. i would tell him he got one person in new hampshire. [inaudible] >> who do you think is the leader of the party? >> it isn't jon boehner. he has no control over the pulpit or even in the senate look at ted cruz. ted cruz wouldn't say mitch mcconnell is the leader by any means. i think it's just so loose and -- i would like to process a chris christie. >> that's the point. if i went around the sherman act and as everybody who the leader of the republican party is, either we get no answers or 40 different answers. so when you don't have somebody that sets the standard, sets the tone, this happened. people start talking. you start sounding a little dysfunctional like you're suffering from multiple -- multiple personality disorder. that is happening to re
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)